Major Skills Needed To Be A General Contractor

Major Skills Needed To Be A General Contractor 3,5/5 1534 votes

Please enable javascript to play this video. Quick Facts: Construction Managers$93,370 per year$44.89 per hourBachelor's degreeNoneModerate-term on-the-job training403,80011% (Faster than average)44,800Construction managers plan, coordinate, budget, and supervise construction projects from start to finish.Many construction managers have a main office, but spend most of their time working out of a field office at a construction site, where they monitor the project and make daily decisions about construction activities. The need to meet deadlines and respond to emergencies often requires construction managers to work many hours.Construction managers typically must have a bachelor’s degree, and learn management techniques through on-the-job training. Large construction firms increasingly prefer candidates with both construction experience and a bachelor’s degree in a construction-related field.The median annual wage for construction managers was $93,370 in May 2018.Employment of construction managers is projected to grow 11 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. Construction managers are expected to be needed to oversee the anticipated increase in construction activity over the coming decade.

Those with a bachelor’s degree in construction science, construction management, or civil engineering, coupled with construction experience, will have the best job prospects.Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for construction managers.Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of construction managers with similar occupations.Learn more about construction managers by visiting additional resources, including O.NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations. Construction managers often collaborate with engineers and architects.Construction managers plan, coordinate, budget, and supervise construction projects from start to finish. Construction managers supervise on-site activity.Construction managers held about 403,800 jobs in 2016. The largest employers of construction managers were as follows: Self-employed workers38%Specialty trade contractors18Nonresidential building construction15Residential building construction10Heavy and civil engineering construction7Many construction managers have a main office, but they spend most of their time working out of a field office at the construction site, where they monitor the project and make daily decisions about construction activities.

For those managing multiple projects, frequent travel between sites is required. Work SchedulesMost construction managers work full time. However, the need to meet deadlines and to respond to delays and emergencies often requires construction managers to work many additional hours. Many construction managers may also be on call 24 hours a day. Some construction managers work more than 40 hours per week. New construction managers are typically hired as assistants and work under the guidance of an experienced manager.Construction managers typically must have a bachelor’s degree, and learn management techniques through on-the-job training. Large construction firms increasingly prefer candidates with both construction experience and a bachelor’s degree in a construction-related field.

Although some individuals with a high school diploma and many years of experience in a construction trade may be hired as construction managers, these individuals are typically qualified to become self-employed general contractors. EducationAlthough there are various ways to enter this occupation, it is becoming increasingly important for construction managers to have a bachelor’s degree in construction science, construction management, architecture, or engineering. As construction processes become more complex, employers are placing greater importance on specialized education.More than 100 colleges and universities offer accredited bachelor’s degree programs in construction science, building science, or construction engineering. These programs include courses in project control and management, design, construction methods and materials, cost estimation, building codes and standards, and contract administration.

Courses in mathematics and statistics are also relevant.More than fifty 2-year colleges offer construction management or construction technology programs. An associate’s degree combined with work experience is typical for managers who supervise smaller projects.A few universities offer master’s degree programs in construction management.Jobseekers with a high school diploma and several years of relevant work experience may qualify to become a construction manager, although most are qualified to become self-employed general contractors. TrainingNew construction managers are typically hired as assistants and work under the guidance of an experienced manager. This training period may last several months to several years, depending on the firm. Work Experience in a Related OccupationIf the typical education is not obtained, practical construction experience is important for jobseekers, because it reduces the need for initial on-the-job training.

Internships, cooperative education programs, and previous work in the construction industry can provide that experience. Some construction managers become qualified solely through extensive construction experience, spending many years in carpentry, masonry, or other construction specialties. Licenses, Certifications, and RegistrationsAlthough not required, certification is valuable because it can demonstrate that a person has gained knowledge and experience.The awards the Certified Construction Manager (CCM) designation to workers who have the required experience and who pass a technical exam. It is recommended that applicants for this certification complete a self-study course that covers the professional role of a construction manager, legal issues, the allocation of risk, and other topics related to construction management.The awards the Associate Constructor (AC) and Certified Professional Constructor (CPC) designations to candidates who meet its requirements and pass the appropriate construction exams.Some states require licensure for construction managers. For more information, contact your state licensing board.

Important QualitiesAnalytical skills. Construction managers plan project strategies, handle unexpected issues and delays, and solve problems that arise over the course of the project. In addition, many managers use cost-estimating and planning software to determine costs and the materials and time required to complete projects.Business skills.

Major Skills Needed To Be A General Contractor Job

Construction managers address budget matters and coordinate and supervise workers. Choosing competent staff and establishing good working relationships with them is critical.Customer-service skills. Construction managers are in constant contact with owners, inspectors, and the public. They must form good working relationships with these people and ensure their needs are met.Decisionmaking skills. Construction managers choose personnel and subcontractors for specific tasks and jobs. Often, these choices must be made quickly to meet deadlines and budgets.Initiative.

Self-employed construction managers generate their own business opportunities and must be proactive in finding new clients. They often market their services and bid on jobs, and they must also learn to perform special home improvement projects, such as installing mosaic glass tiles, sanding wood floors, and insulating homes.Leadership skills. Construction managers must effectively delegate tasks to construction workers, subcontractors, and other lower level managers.Speaking skills. Construction managers must give clear orders, explain complex information to construction workers and clients, and discuss technical details with other building specialists, such as architects. Self-employed construction managers must get their own projects, so the need to sell their services to potential clients is critical.Technical skills. Construction managers must know construction methods and technologies, and must be able to interpret contracts and technical drawings.Time-management skills. Construction managers must meet deadlines.

They ensure that construction phases are completed on time so that the next phase can begin as scheduled. For instance, a building’s foundation cannot be constructed until the land is completely excavated.Writing skills. Construction managers must write proposals, plans, and budgets, as well as document the progress of the work for clients and others involved in the building process. Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment StatisticsThe median annual wage for construction managers was $93,370 in May 2018.The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $55,240, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $161,510.In May 2018, the median annual wages for construction managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows: Heavy and civil engineering construction$97,180Nonresidential building construction95,150Specialty trade contractors90,170Residential building construction83,640In addition to salary, construction managers may also earn bonuses.

Their earnings are highly dependent on the amount of business they generate.Most construction managers work full time. However, the need to meet deadlines and to respond to delays and emergencies often requires construction managers to work many additional hours. Many construction managers also may be on call 24 hours a day. Some construction managers work more than 40 hours per week.

Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.Source: U.S.

Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections programEmployment of construction managers is projected to grow 11 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations.Construction managers are expected to be needed as overall construction activity expands. Over the coming decade, population and business growth will result in the construction of new residences, office buildings, retail outlets, hospitals, schools, restaurants, and other structures.

Also, the need to improve portions of the national infrastructure may spur employment growth as roads, bridges, and sewer pipe systems are upgraded or replaced.In addition, a growing emphasis on retrofitting buildings to make them more energy efficient should create jobs for general contractors, who are more likely to manage the renovation and upgrading of buildings than oversee new large-scale construction projects.To ensure that projects are completed on time and under budget, firms require construction managers to oversee them. Furthermore, construction processes and building technology are becoming more complex, requiring greater oversight and spurring demand for specialized management personnel. Job ProspectsJob opportunities for construction managers are expected to be good. Specifically, jobseekers with a bachelor’s degree in construction science, construction management, or civil engineering, coupled with construction experience, will have the best job prospects.In addition to employment growth creating many new jobs, construction managers are expected to retire or leave the occupation in substantial numbers over the next decade, resulting in further job openings.Employment of construction managers, like that of many other construction workers, is sensitive to fluctuations in the economy. On the one hand, workers in the construction industry may experience periods of unemployment when the overall level of construction falls.

On the other hand, peak periods of building activity may produce abundant job opportunities for construction managers. Employment projections data for construction managers, 2016-26 Occupational TitleSOC CodeEmployment, 2016Projected Employment, 2026Change, 2016-26Employment by IndustryPercentNumericSOURCE: U.S.

Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections programConstruction managers,8144,800. State & Area Data Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)The (OES) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OES data maps for employment and wages by state and area.Projections CentralOccupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices.

Major Skills Needed To Be A General Contractor

All state projections data are available at. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved. CareerOneStopCareerOneStop includes hundreds of with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a to search for wages by zip code.

Major Skills Needed To Be A General Contractor Make

PayThe Pay tab describes typical earnings and how workers in the occupation are compensated—annual salaries, hourly wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses. Within every occupation, earnings vary by experience, responsibility, performance, tenure, and geographic area. For most profiles, this tab has a table with wages in the major industries employing the occupation. It does not include pay for self-employed workers, agriculture workers, or workers in private households because these data are not collected by the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey, the source of BLS wage data in the OOH.

Major Skills Needed To Be A General Contractors

Career Goals and Educational NeedsCertificateAssociateBachelor’sOnlineI have a little bit of experience with construction, but do not know if contracting or construction management is right for me. I need a degree that leaves options open.I’ve been working as an apprentice for a few years and am ready to strike out on my own.

I’ve noticed my competition tends to have more education than I do right now. I need a program that can validate my skills without a lengthy commitment.I’ve always wanted to run my own construction company, but I know that it doesn’t happen overnight. It’s time to get an education that will open doors to management positions.I am a full-time worker who would like to launch or advance my career. I need a construction management program that fits my schedule. CredentialsContractor credentials and certificates often voluntary, but some states do expect them for abatement issues, like removing lead or asbestos. The credentials a contractor pursues depend heavily upon the work they tend t perform.

For example, the LEED Green Associate is great for those who are into green building, while the Certified Welding Supervisor is obviously for those who are working in the welding field. Registered Roof Consultant, Commercial Mechanical Inspector, and Master Ground Water Contractor are a few other examples.Most credentials are awarded by associations or organizations that cater to that particular field. Contractors should look into the associations that support their profession to learn more.